Damore, Hamric & Schneider, Inc.

To grow but never lose the local identity and personal relationship with clients that are the foundation of our practice.

A professional accounting firm must be many things to its clientele.  A management and financial advisor, a business consultant, an investment counselor and a tax and pension planner, in addition to providing the traditional accounting, auditing and tax services.  With many years of experience in the accounting field, the professionals at the Firm have proven their ability to do a job and are highly respected throughout the area.  Through our continuing education in this rapidly changing field and in modern computer technology, the Firm is able to provide just the right combination of consulting services, accounting skills and tax expertise for a large variety of businesses and other organizations.

Damore, Hamric & Schneider, Inc. is one of the greater Sacramento area’s largest accounting and tax preparation firms. 

Our firm is devoted to quality, and we have taken extra steps to assure that we meet the highest professional standards of quality.  All members of our professional staff receive extensive continuing education to keep abreast of current accounting, auditing, review and tax issues.

Newsletters

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

The Internal Revenue Service announced a new Voluntary Disclosure Program that gives at employers who received erroneous Employee Retention Credit funds the opportunity pay them back at a discounted rate.


The IRS has provided certain eligible taxpayers with automatic relief from additions to tax for failure to pay income tax for tax years 2020 and 2021Relief is only available to taxpayers who filed an eligible return during the relief period, which begins on either the date the IRS issued an initial balance due notice or February 5, 2022, whichever is later, ends on March 31, 2024.


The IRS has issued final regulations regarding the de minimis safe harbors from the penalties under Code Sec. 6721 for failure to file information returns and Code Sec. 6722 for failure to furnish payee statements. The regulations also include the time and manner a payee may elect out of the safe harbor, as well as rules on reporting basis of securities by brokers as it relates to the de minimis safe harbors. The final regulations adopt the 2018 proposed regulations with only minor modifications.


The Treasury Department and the IRS have issued guidance pertaining to the new credit for qualified commercial clean vehicles, established by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (P.L. 117-169). Notice 2024-5 establishes a safe harbor regarding the incremental cost of certain qualified commercial clean vehicles placed in service in calendar year 2024.


The IRS and the Department of Treasury (the Treasury) have announced that they intend to propose regulations to implement the product identification number (PIN) requirement with respect to the energy efficient home improvement credit under Code Sec. 25C as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (IRA) (P. L. 117-169). The IRS has also requested comments on the PIN requirement under Code Sec. 25C(h) (PIN requirement) by February 27, 2024.


Taxpayers may rely on an IRS notice that describes forthcoming regulations for the alternative fuel vehicle refueling property credit. The notice focuses on the census tract requirement added by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (P.L. 117-169). 


The IRS has provided relief from the failure to furnish a payee statement penalty under Code Sec. 6722 to certain partnerships with unrealized receivables or inventory items described in Code Sec. 751(a) (Section 751 property) that fail to furnish, by the due date specified in Reg. §1.6050K-1(c)(1), Part IV of Form 8308, Report of a Sale or Exchange of Certain Partnership Interests, to the transferor and transferee in a Section 751(a) exchange that occurred in calendar year 2023.


The IRS has issued a notice addressing the availability of administrative exemptions from the requirement to file certain returns and other documents in electronic form. The notice also addresses the availability of information about the procedure to request a waiver of the requirement to file electronically Forms 1120, 1120-S, 1120-F, and 1065. In addition, thr IRS has provided information about resources pertaining to failed attempts to electronically file Forms 1120, 1120-S, and 1120-F using IRS filing systems.


Although 2023 was a year of transition for the IRS and taxpayers, National Taxpayer Advocate Erin Collins has reason to be more optimistic for 2024.


An increased emphasis on millionaires who may be evading taxes by Internal Revenue Service compliance staff has resulted in collection of $482 million to date, agency Commissioner Daniel Werfel reported.


Department of the Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen touted the corporate transparency that will come with the new beneficial ownership reporting requirements, which went into effect at the start of 2024.


The future of the Affordable Care Act and its associated taxes has moved to the Senate following passage of the American Health Care Act (AHCA) in the House in April. Traditionally, legislation moves more slowly in the Senate than in the House, which means that any ACA repeal and replacement bill may be weeks if not months away.


As “hurricane season” officially begins, the IRS has released a number a tax tips, reminders and other advice to help taxpayers weather the storm of natural disasters and similar emergencies. The underlying theme for all IRS "tax tips" is that recordkeeping has generally become easier in the digital age. However, it remains the primary responsibility of the taxpayer to preserve adequate records whether or not caused by a disaster.


President Trump on April 26th, just before his “100 days” in office, unveiled his highly-anticipated tax reform outline –the “2017 Tax Reform for Economic Growth and American Jobs.” The outline calls for dramatic tax cuts and simplification: lower individual tax rates under a three-bracket structure, doubling the standard deduction, and more than halving the corporate tax rate; along with changing the tax treatment of pass-through businesses, expanding child and dependent incentives, and more. Both the alternative minimum tax and the federal estate tax would be eliminated. The White House proposal does not include spending and tax incentives for infrastructure; nor a controversial “border tax.”


Although the employee may end up with the same amount whether something is designated a tip or a service charge, the IRS reporting requirements for the employer do differ. Basically, any amount required to be paid by a customer rather than at the customer’s discretion is considered a service charge by the IRS.